Tuesday, April 14, 2009

More About Area 51

Slashdot has a pointer to an LA Times interview with some former workers from Area 51.  

The problem is the myths of Area 51 are hard to dispute if no one can speak on the record about what actually happened there. Well, now, for the first time, someone is ready to talk—in fact, five men are, and their stories rival the most outrageous of rumors. Colonel Hugh “Slip” Slater, 87, was commander of the Area 51 base in the 1960s. Edward Lovick, 90, featured in “What Plane?” in LA's March issue, spent three decades radar testing some of the world's most famous aircraft (including the U-2, the A-12 OXCART and the F-117). Kenneth Collins, 80, a CIA experimental test pilot, was given the silver star. Thornton “T.D.” Barnes, 72, was an Area 51 special-projects engineer. And Harry Martin, 77, was one of the men in charge of the base's half-million-gallon monthly supply of spy-plane fuels.


And the quintessential Area 51 conspiracy.that the Pentagon keeps captured alien spacecraft there, which they fly around in restricted airspace? Turns out that one's pretty easy to debunk. The shape of OXCART was unprece-dented, with its wide, disk-like fuselage designed to carry vast quantities of fuel. Commercial pilots cruising over Nevada at dusk would look up and see the bottom of OXCART whiz by at 2,000-plus mph. The aircraft's tita-nium body, moving as fast as a bullet, would reflect the sun's rays in a way that could make anyone think, UFO.

In all, 2,850 OXCART test flights were flown out of Area 51 while Slater was in charge. “That's a lot of UFO sightings!” Slater adds. Commercial pilots would report them to the FAA, and “when they'd land in California, they'd be met by FBI agents who'd make them sign nondisclosure forms.” But not everyone kept quiet, hence the birth of Area 51's UFO lore. The sightings incited uproar in Nevada and the surrounding areas and forced the Air Force to open Project BLUE BOOK to log each claim.
The A-12 OXCART was the single-seat (except for a trainer) predecessor to the SR-71 Blackbird.

One interesting story I read (I'll have to go back to find the citation) said the Blackbird was originally called the RS-71 but Lyndon Johnson flubbed the name in a speech, so they went back and changed all occurances of the name to the SR-71.